HOME
 
Weekly Poll
Question for the week of: Monday 11/17 - Sunday 11/23
What do you think about Will Muschampís dismissal as the University of Florida football coach?
He deserved more time
It should have happened a long time ago
What's your opinion on the issues? The Daily Record will have a question each week and it's your chance to make yourself heard.

Poll Results
Monday 11/10 - Sunday 11/16
How far are you planning to travel for the Thanksgiving holiday?
The results through Internet voting:
I'm staying home - 71%
Up to 20 miles - 8%
21-50 miles - 2%
More than 51 miles - 19%
Last Week
Month
3 Months
Dictionary


Displaying 1 to 15 (of 38 total) records
Next Records >   Last Records >>
Search For Another Word

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Search Again

Viewing 1 to 15 (of 38 total) records

Taft-Hartley
The name of an American federal labor law which was passed in 1947, and which sought to "equalize legal responsibilities of labor organizations and employers"; ie. balance the Wagner Act, which, it was felt, may have gone to far in protecting union rights. Where the Wagner Act had was aimed primarily at employer behavior, the Taft-Hartley was aimed at unions and sought to restrain their activities under certain circumstances, by detailing union rights and duties. For example, the Taft-Hartley Act exempted supervisors from it's provisions, allowed employees to decline participation in union activities and permitted union decertification petitions.

Tamper
To interfere improperly or in violation of the law such as to tamper with a document. The term "jury tampering" means to illegally disrupt the independence of a jury member with a view to influencing that juror otherwise than by the production of evidence in open court.

Tax Court of the United States
A judicial body which hears cases concerning federal tax laws.

Taxable income
The income against which tax rates are applied to compute tax paid; gross income of businesses or adjusted gross income of individuals less deductions and exemptions.

Temporary relief
Any form of action by a court granting one of the parties an order to protect its interest pending further action by the court.

Temporary restraining order
An emergency remedy of brief duration issued by a court only in exceptional circumstances, usually when immediate or irreparable damages or loss might result before the opposition could take action.

Tenancy by the entireties
A form of co-ownership in English law where, when a husband transferred land to his wife, the property could not be sold unless both spouses agreed nor could it be severed except by ending the marriage.

Tenant
A person to whom a landlord grants temporary and exclusive use of land or a part of a building, usually in exchange for rent. The contract for this type of legal arrangement is called a lease. The word "tenant" originated under the feudal system, referring to land "owners" who held their land on tenure granted by a lord.

Tenants in common
Similar to joints tenants. All tenants in common share equal property rights except that, upon the death of a tenant in common, that share does not go to the surviving tenants but is transferred to the estate of the deceased tenant. Unity of possession but distinct titles.

Tender
An unconditional offer of a party to a contract to perform their part of the bargain. For example, if the contract is a loan contract, a tender would be an act of the debtor where he produces the amount owing and offers to the creditor. In real property law, when a party suspects that the other may be preparing to renege, he or she can write a tender in which they unequivocally re-assert their intention to respect the contract and tender their end of the bargain; either by paying the purchase or delivering the title.

Tenement
Property that could be subject to tenure under English land law; usually land, buildings or apartments. The word is rarely used nowadays except to refer to dominant or servient tenements when qualifying easements.

Tenure
A right of holding or occupying land or a position for a certain amount of time. The term was first used in the English feudal land system, whereby all land belonged to the king but was lent out to lords for a certain period of time; the lord never owning, but having tenure in the land. Used in modern law mostly to refer to a position a person occupies such as in the expression "a judge holds tenure for life and on good behavior."

Testamentary capacity
The legal ability to make a will.

Testamentary trust
A trust which is to take effect only upon the death of the settlor and is commonly found as part of a will. Trusts which take effect during the life of the settlor are called inter vivos trusts.

Testator
A person who dies with a valid will.

Published for 26,532 consecutive weekdays
 
Bailey Publishing and Communications, Inc. Bailey Printing & Imaging Realty Builder Connection
Covering events in the Realty and Building communities in Northeast Florida.
10 North Newnan Street · Jacksonville, FL 32202 · (904) 356-2466 · Fax (904) 353-2628
© 2014 Bailey Publishing & Communications, Inc. All Right Reserved.

Privacy Policy · Refund Policy