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Jax Daily Record Wednesday, Jun. 28, 201708:33 AM EST

Nonprofit News: EKG machine donated to Volunteers in Medicine

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First Tennessee Bank donated $2,700 to help Volunteers in Medicine purchase a new EKG machine.

Volunteers in Medicine provides medical services to Northeast Florida’s working uninsured families to keep them healthy and out of hospital emergency rooms.

 “First Tennessee’s donation was truly a lifesaver,” said Victoria Findley, a doctor and medical director of Volunteers in Medicine. “The EKG machine plays a critical role in the treatment and diagnosis of our patients because every new patient we see over the age of 50 is given an EKG test to establish a baseline and to screen for cardiac disease.” 

To qualify for Volunteers in Medicine services, patients must work at least 20 hours per week and earn an annual income between $13,000 and 250 percent of federal poverty guidelines ($29,500 for a single-person household).

Any Given Child awards $5,000 in grants

Any Given Child Jacksonville awarded $7,500 to six organizations and educators for their contributions to arts in the community.

AGC Jacksonville works to provide more equitable access to quality arts education in Duval County public schools.

A $2,500 award was presented to educator Karen Bouton at the Duval County Public Schools Celebration of the Arts event in March.

Members of the AGC Jacksonville steering committee and working groups then nominated and voted on recipients for the remaining $2,500, which was awarded at $1,000 and $500 levels. Here are the awards:

Mai Dinh Keisling received $1,000 for her service in the visual arts at Paxon School for Advanced Studies, her volunteerism with AGC and the Jacksonville Public Education Fund, and her leadership and advocacy for immigrant and ESL students and families.

CooperMorgan Dance received $500 for its work with the student and community programming for the Ritz Theatre and Museum’s exhibition “Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts.”

Hope at Hand received $500 for its work with at-risk girls, assisting poetry and altered book sessions, as well as its service to public school teachers through professional development opportunities.

Jax Kids Mural Festival received $500 for its initiatives engaging students in mural- making at schools in Duval County.

For more information, visit http://capkids.org/any-given-child/agcjax/

Publix collects $154,802 from shoppers for The Salvation Army

Publix Super Markets’ 2016 Food for All campaign, in which customers donated at checkout to help provide food for families in need, raised $154,802 for The Salvation Army of Northeast Florida’s hunger programs. 

The Salvation Army of Northeast Florida provides a daily hot dinner for the homeless and the working poor in Jacksonville and provides three meals a day for the residents of the Red Shield Lodge homeless shelter for women and families, as well as the Towers Center of Hope housing for men.

The organization also distributes supplemental groceries though its food pantry, serving 250 households each week. Last year, The Salvation Army Jacksonville Area Command served 168,807 meals and 12,122 grocery orders. 

Students raise $33,020 to help Dreams Come True

Students at 21  schools raised $33,020 in Dreams Come True’s Kids Helping Kids program during the 2016-17 school year.

The money helped fulfill the dreams of 15 local children battling life-threatening illnesses.

Schools, youth groups, clubs or any youth organization interested in participating in the Kids Helping Kids program can contact Kate Wirz, development coordinator for Dreams Come True, at [email protected] or (904) 296-3030. 

Fundraising projects can include car washes, bake sales, dances, talent shows, coin collections and other activities. 

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