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Jax Daily Record Thursday, Mar. 23, 201712:00 PM EST

Stellers Gallery relocating to Philips

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After 25 years on San Marco Square, Scott Riley is moving Stellers Gallery 4 miles south next to Hugo’s Furniture.

Riley will leave the 4,500-square-foot gallery at 1409 Atlantic Blvd. for a 11,000-square-foot space at 3139 Philips Highway. The San Marco building he leased was sold.

Riley will close Stellers in San Marco April 1 and open along Philips Highway April 18.

A celebration for Riley’s “New Beginnings” is scheduled from 6-9 p.m. March 30 at the San Marco gallery.

Stellers, a full-service fine art gallery, said the new location makes it one of the largest art galleries in the Southeast and it is one of the longest-operating, privately owned galleries in Northeast Florida.

Riley has been a gallerist and art dealer in the area for more than 32 years. He opened Stellers Gallery in 1985 when he began to represent his brother, wildlife and environmental artist, C. Ford Riley. The gallery was named after one of Ford Riley’s first successful paintings, the Stellers Jay.

Their brother, Paul Riley, is an artist. Their late mother, Maureen, also was a painter and founded the “Artist Five” group of women artists.

In a news release, Stellers said Scott Riley has worked with many Jacksonville artists, including Jim Draper, Steve Williams and Dennis Campay. The gallery represents more than 20 artists.

Stellers Gallery Director Missy Hager said the new location will position the business “as the largest go-to art resource for regional residents, interior designers and corporate clients.”

Hager said the San Marco building was bought by the owner of Industry West. Its Facebook page says it is a manufacturer of industrial and modern furniture, with designs crafted from metal, reclaimed woods and distressed fabrics.

Uptown Cheapskate to open in Mandarin Landing

Salt Lake City-based Uptown Cheapskate, a resale clothing store for teenagers and young adults, will join Mandarin Landing shopping center, likely by July 1.

Basecamp Franchising, which franchises the brand, said the Jacksonville owners are Steve Tucker and Cindy Swank.

The city approved a permit for DHP Construction LLC to renovate 3,365 square feet of space at the shopping center, at 10601 San Jose Blvd., at a construction cost of $120,000.

It will go in near Kid to Kid, which also is franchised by Basecamp Franchising. The Jacksonville Kid to Kid franchise is owned by Amy Green and opened April 28.

Uptown Cheapskate opened its first store in 2009 in Salt Lake City. Kid to Kid was founded in 1992 for children’s clothing, toys and baby gear as well as maternity items.

Uptown Cheapskate has expanded to more than 65 franchises throughout the country.

Uptown Cheapskate’s website says the stores buy and sell gently used fashion apparel in an upscale environment and provide a convenient place where young adults are financially and emotionally rewarded for recycling their best items.

Hardage-Giddens expanding Oaklawn facilities

Hardage-Giddens Oaklawn Chapel and Oaklawn Cemetery, part of the Dignity Memorial network, said it will add a new chapel and Life Well Celebrated Center north of the cemetery on Inman Place off San Jose Boulevard.

Jody Brandenburg, president of Hardage-Giddens Funeral Homes, Cemeteries and Cremations, said he expects to break ground by June.

He said the $4 million investment includes the land purchase of six acres in August and the development costs.

The center will provide a larger funeral and reception area as well as expanded parking facilities for funerals and memorial services.

Brandenburg said the acreage, bought from the Shad Family Plantation, will allow options such as family estates and private family mausoleums.

Oaklawn Cemetery opened in 1927.

Tommy C. Shad, owner and caretaker of the Shad family property next to the cemetery, said in a news release the family made the decision to sell the property to Hardage-Giddens Oaklawn after many years of determining what was in the best interest of the family.

“We wanted a buyer who would honor and preserve the property and one who would take an active role in maintaining the integrity of its unique beauty,” Shad said.

He said Oaklawn was the best fit. “And we are confident in its reputation and heritage,” he said.

Brandenburg said no contractor has been chosen and that completion depends on permitting.

[email protected]

@MathisKb

(904) 356-2466

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